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Post Info TOPIC: Lancaster LL-964 crashlanding in Belgium


Squadron Leader

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Lancaster LL-964 crashlanding in Belgium
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Hello ,

 

On november 2 1944   Lancaster LL-964 from N° 103 sqdn made a crashlanding near St-Gérard in Belgium . The crew was  :

 

F/SCooke J.C. RCAF ( SAFE ) -  Sgt McGrath E.W  - F/S Goff J.A. RCAF  - F/S Mann A.E. RCAF (EVD)  - F/S Hill F.I.R. RCAF  - F/S McCoubrey J.H.C. RCAF  - F/S Orr O. RCAF .

Who can help me with the firstnames of the crewmembers.

Regards

Moon

 

 



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Moon


Wing Commander

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Here are five of them
Cooke - Jackson Chartris - see information from Airforce.ca - Honours & Awards below
Goff - James Alfred
McCoubrey - John Herbert Charles
Orr - Melvin Osborne You can access a picture of him here:
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/sub.cfm?source=collections/virtualmem/Detail&casualty=2032314
Hill - Francis Ignatius Roy Bruce
"COOKE, FS Jackson Chartis (R173576) - Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Flying) - No.103 Squadron - Award effective 2 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born in Grey County, Ontario, 24 March 1924. Home in Oakville, Ontario where he was a student and construction worker for British-American Oil Company, 1942. Enlisted Hamilton, 6 July 1942. Attached to No.4 WS, Guelph for pay16 July to 30 September 1942. To No.1 Manning Depot, Toronto, 1 October 1942. To No.5 ITS, Belleville, 24 January 1943. Graduated and promoted LAC, 3 April 1943; to No.13 EFTS, St. Eugene, 4 April 1943; graduated 28 May 1943 and posted on 30 May 1943 to No.17 SFTS, Souris, Manitoba. Graduated and promoted Sergeant, 17 September 1943. To \"Y\" Depot, Halifax, 2 October 1943. Embarked from New York, 8 October 1943. Disembarked in Britain, 16 October 1943 and posted to No.3 PRC, Bournemouth. Attached to Headquarters, No.50 Group, 3-31 December 1943. Attached to No.2 EFTS for the same dates. To No.15 Advanced Flying Unit, 11 January 1944. Attached to Beam Approach Training Flight at Waterfield, 7-21 March 1944. To No.28 OTU, 23 April 1944. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 17 June 1944 To No.11 Base, 17 July 1944. To No.103 Squadron, 9 September 1944. Killed in action 29 November 1944 with this unit (Lancaster PB465 which collided with another aircraft; the Air Bomber - 152769 F/O G.T. Mortimer, baled out and the aircraft then exploded, killing all others); buried in Germany. Medal presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947.

One night in October 1944, this airman was captain and pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. Whilst over the target considerable anti-aircraft fire was encountered. Just as the bombs were released the aircraft was struck by high explosive shells. Much damage was sustained. The starboard rudder controls were severed. The petrol tanks were badly pierced and the contents streamed out. Within ten minutes the petrol supply became practically exhausted. By now Flight Sergeant Cooke had reached friendly territory. He thereupon instructed the crew to leave the aircraft by parachute. As he prepared to leave himself, Flight Sergeant Cooke saw that one of his comrades still remained in the aircraft, having accidentally released his parachute inside the fuselage. Height was being rapidly lost. Nevertheless, Flight Sergeant Cooke was determined not to leave his crew member and promptly returned to the controls and attempted to effect a crash landing in a field. During his approach, with undercarriage and flaps retracted, two engines failed. Coolly and skilfully, however, this intrepid pilot achieved his purpose and effected a landing, incurring little further damage to the aircraft in his effort. This airman set a magnificent example of skill, courage and captaincy in most difficult and dangerous circumstances.

Training: At No.5 ITS he placed 52nd in a class of 119. At EFTS he flew Finch aircraft (32.40 day dual, 26.00 day solo and four hours at night). Also logged ten hours in Link. Flew 13.50 dual before first solo and had 6.55 on instruments. His Link instructor wrote, \"Very good attitude to instruction, above average performance, coordination very good.\" The CFI described him thus: \"****y attitude; loops and spins very good, very keen, slight tendency to change airspeed on instruments.\"

At No. 17 SFTS he flew Ansons - 7.30 day dual to first day solo, 85.10 day dual and 49.30 day solo; night flying was three hours dual to first night solo, 12.30 night dual, 11.50 night solo. Also 18.45 as passenger. Flew 11.50 in formation and 26.05 on instruments plus 25 hours in Link. Ground subjects and marks as follows: Airmanship (88/200, wrote a supplemental and scored 127/200), Armament (155/200), Navigation (112/200), Signals (179/200), Aircraft Recognition (60/100), Meteorology (74/100). Flying tests as follows: General Flying (216/300), Instrument Flying (150/200), Navigation (100/150), Armament (121/150), Night Flying (38/50), and Link (37/50). Deemed suitable for any role except Flying Instructor.

Course at No.15 (P) AFU was 8 Fevruary to 25 April 1944 with time off for BAT Course (see below). Flying on Oxford aircraft - 6.30 day dual to first day solo, 31.45 day dual, 28.20 day solo, 6.35 as passenger, 6.30 in formation, 5.05 on instruments and 11.25 in Link. Night flying was the BAT course.

Course at No.1 Beam Approach School was 8 March to 24 March 1944. All flying in Oxford aircraft (18 hours 15 minutes day dual, two hours five minutes night dual. All flying was done on beam and instruments. Also logged seven hours 20 minutes in Link. Flying tests as follows: Beam Approach Procedure and \"Q\" Codes, taken in Link (140/200), Receiver Operation (75/100), Instrument Flying (165/250), Cloud and Night Flying (160/250), General Application of B.A. Procedure on Flying (135/200). Assessed as follows: \"Apart from occasional difficulty with his Instrument Flying this pilot made good progress during the course. Link Trainer work was above average and work in the air was of a good average standard. Standard of Instrument Flying was satisfactory on completion of the course.\"

Course at No.28 OTU was 25 April to 17 July 1944. All flying on Wellington X and III aircraft and at night (5.15 dual to first solo, 4.25 dual, 25.00 solo, 1.20 formation, 2.30 on instruments and 10.45 in Link. Ground examinations in Airmanship (210/300), Armament (205/300), Navigation (136/200), and Signals (60/100); apparently no Meteorology course. Flying test in General Flying (240/400), Applied Flying (120/200), Instrument Flying (150/250), Night Flying (60/100) and Link (30/50). \"An average pilot and captain of aircraft with no special flying faults; has shown average keenness and experienced no difficulties on the course.\" However, G/C J.R. Bell specifically noted, \"Not recommended for commission.\"

The website Lost Bombers provides the following information on the sortie when he earned his award, and the sortie on which he was killed:

31 October/1 November 1944: Lancaster LL964 (PM-H) of No.103 Squadron, target Cologne. This aircraft was initially delivered to No.460 Squadron, 18 May1944, joining No.103 Squadron on 25 August 1944. When lost this aircraft had a total of 389 hours. Airborne at 1749 hours, 31 October 1944 from Elsham Wolds. Hit by Flak over the target, which damaged fuel tanks and the rudder controls. The crew turned towards the allied lines and when over Namur, Belgium, the order to abandon was given. Flight Sergeant J.H.C. McCoubrey (RCAF) had the misfortune to open his parachute while still in the aircraft and by the time he had located the spare \'chute, the Lancaster was dangerously low. Exercising airmanship of the highest order, Flight Sergeant Cooke crash-landed at St-Gerard (Namur), 14 km NW of Dinant, without injury to himself or Flight Sergeant McCoubrey. Crew on this occasion were Flight Sergeant J.C.Cooke, RCAF, Sergeant E.W.McGrath, Flight Sergeant J.A.Goff, RCAF, Flight Sergeant A.E.Mann, RCAF, Flight Sergeant P.I.R.B.Hill, RCAF, Flight Sergeant J.H.C.McCoubrey, RCAF, Flight Sergeant M.O.Orr, RCAF.

29/30 November 1944: Lancaster PB465 (PM-F), target Dortmund. This aircraft was delivered to No.103 Squadron, August 1944. When lost this aircraft Had a total of 236 hours. Airborne at 1146 hours, 29 November 1944 from Elsham Wolds. Involved in a mid-air collision with a No.550 Squadron Lancaster. Sustained damage, the severity of such being that control was lost immediately. The other Lancaster managed to limp back to a crash landing at Manston, Kent. Crew were Sergeant J.C.Cooke, CGM, (killed), Sergeant E.W. McGrath (killed), Flight Sergeant J.A. Goff, RCAF (killed), F/O G.T. Mortimer (injured), Warrant Officer F.I.R.B. Hill, RCAF (killed), Flight Sergeant J.H.C.McCoubrey, RCAF (killed), and F/O M.O. Orr"

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Squadron Leader

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Thank you very much for your reply.

Moon

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Moon
Andy Frish

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Just for your interest, Lancaster PB465 was delivered new to 103 Squadron and was my father's aircraft, nicknamed "Mudpool Maggie II" where my mother Margaret was affectionately known as Mudpool Maggie I. She painted the nose art of the side of the ****pit. Father Tony was lucky - his last operation with the aircraft was on November 27th 1944 and PB465 "bought it" only 2 days later in that mid air collsion. Cheers Andy Frish



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Squadron Leader

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Hello Andy ,

 

Thanks very much for this information .

 

Greetings from a freezing Belgium



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Moon
Anonymous

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I would help you with the names e-mail me and tell me why.  Rocky rbogseth@sympatico.ca



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Aircraftsman 1st Class

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Andy Frish wrote:

Just for your interest, Lancaster PB465 was delivered new to 103 Squadron and was my father's aircraft, nicknamed "Mudpool Maggie II" where my mother Margaret was affectionately known as Mudpool Maggie I. She painted the nose art of the side of the ****pit. Father Tony was lucky - his last operation with the aircraft was on November 27th 1944 and PB465 "bought it" only 2 days later in that mid air collsion. Cheers Andy Frish


Hi Andy, 

I was amazed to come across your post. My uncle was your Dad's navigator throughout their entire operational tour (according to his flight log).  Pls contact me at permia@live.com and perhaps we could exchange information and pictures (of which I have a couple).

Mike



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Doug Smiley

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My Uncle was F/S Melvin Osborne Orr. I wonder if you have any photos of the PB 465 nose art? My e mail is spike_dog007@live.com



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Mary Smits (née McGrath)

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Hi

My uncle Edward (Eddie) McGrath was the flight engineer on the Lancaster PB465 on the final raid to Dortmund. I would love to hear any information that anyone can share. My email address is marysmits@ymail.com

Thank you so much



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